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TOPIC: Jennie Paluka says "report McGarvie to IBAC"

Jennie Paluka's Vietnam RBA Case 2 weeks 3 days ago #4211

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PoliticsFederal

Envoy had affair with spy in bribery scandal
By Nick McKenzie, Richard Baker
13 August 2012 — 3:00am

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A HIGH-RANKING Australian embassy official had a secret affair with a Vietnamese spy accused of receiving up to $20 million in suspected bribes from a subsidiary of the Reserve Bank.

Senior trade commissioner Elizabeth Masamune - who held a top secret Australian security clearance - met Colonel Anh Ngoc Luong, a top official in Vietnam's state intelligence network, in the early 2000s, when she was based in Hanoi.
Spy ... Colonel Luong Ngoc Anh.

Spy ... Colonel Luong Ngoc Anh.

At the time, Colonel Luong was working with the Reserve firm Securency to win a huge plastic banknote contract with Vietnam's central bank.

Last year Colonel Luong was accused in court by Australian prosecutors and federal police of receiving up to $20 million in suspected bribes from Securency.
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Elizabeth Masamune ... senior trade commissioner.

Elizabeth Masamune ... senior trade commissioner.

Diplomatic sources have confirmed that while Ms Masamune was encouraging Securency to make substantial payments to Colonel Luong in return for his help in winning contracts, she was intimately involved with him.

Ms Masamune did not declare the details of her relationship with Colonel Luong to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade or Australia's intelligence agencies.

As Australia's most senior trade official in Vietnam, Ms Masamune would have received classified Australian government briefings regularly. When contacted last night, Ms Masamune made no comment.

A senior diplomatic source said Australia's spy agencies listed Colonel Luong as a colonel in Vietnam's spy agency, the Ministry of Public Security. He is known to be part of the inner circle of the Prime Minister, Nguyen Tan Dung, and a "bagman" for top Vietnamese officials.

It is understood that when Securency executives complained about the large amount of money it was paying to Colonel Luong, Ms Masamune told them it was the price of doing business in Vietnam.

The revelation of the affair will reignite pressure on the Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, to set up a broad inquiry into the extent to which senior Austrade and Reserve officials supported or covered up bribery and engaged in other improper behaviour.

The Deputy Opposition Leader, Julie Bishop, yesterday said she would seek answers from the Trade Minister, Craig Emerson.

''Given the seriousness of the allegations, it's vital the government disclose its full knowledge,'' she said.

Ms Masamune was one of several Australian officials who directly or indirectly facilitated Securency's allegedly improper dealings, which prosecutors have claimed involved the payment of multimillion-dollar bribes in Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia.

Austrade assisted Securency and Note Printing Australia, another Reserve subsidiary, in 49 countries between 1996 and 2009. NPA is alleged to have bribed officials in Malaysia, Indonesia and Nepal.

The Herald first reported in December documents released under the Freedom of Information Act detailing how Ms Masamune - now based in Sydney as Austrade's general manager for east Asian growth markets - knew in 2001 of Securency's financial dealings with Colonel Luong.

Committal hearings for alleged bribery offences committed by up to eight former Securency and NPA executives are due to begin in Melbourne today.
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RICO applies to Pope: Plaintiffs 2 weeks 3 days ago #4212

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by Stephen Wynne • ChurchMilitant.com • November 16, 2018 309 Comments
Church leaders accused of conspiracy, deception, concealment
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WASHINGTON (ChurchMilitant.com) - On Tuesday, as the U.S. bishops were still absorbing the news that the Vatican had blocked action on clerical sex abuse, they were slapped with two simultaneous lawsuits, with one naming the Holy See as a defendant.

Both lawsuits seek to force open diocesan secret archives by court order, compelling the U.S. Church to reveal the identities and histories of its predators.

One suit, launched by six clerical sex abuse victims, was filed in federal district court in Minnesota. It alleges that the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) concealed "the known histories and identities from the public, parishioners and law enforcement of clergy accused of sexually abusing children across the country."


Speaking Tuesday, Jeff Anderson, attorney for the six plaintiffs, warned the Church "maintains" a threat to public safety.

The same day, a class-action suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia against both the USCCB and the Vatican itself — an unprecedented legal move.
The class-action suit accuses the Church of violating the federal Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, which was originally devised to target organized crime syndicates.
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It accuses the Church of conspiracy and running a criminal enterprise under federal racketeering statutes.

According to the 80-page class-action suit:

This case is about the endemic, systemic, rampant, and pervasive rape and sexual abuse of Plaintiffs and Class Members perpetrated by Roman Catholic Church cardinals, bishops, monsignors, priests, sisters, lay leaders, members of Catholic religious orders, educators, and other of Defendants' personnel, members, agents, and representatives (collectively, "Clergy" or "Catholic Clergy") while serving in active ministry — with the knowledge of Defendants.

It accuses Church leaders of promoting a public hazard by covering up the crimes of predator priests:

Rather than safeguarding and protecting Plaintiffs and Class Members — who were minor children at the time — Defendants protected the abusive Clergy, took extraordinary measures to conceal their wrongful conduct, moved them from parish to parish, without warning church members or the general public, thereby further facilitating their predatory practices, failed and refused to report the abusive Clergy to law enforcement or other responsible authorities as required by law, and — incredibly — even promoted the abusive Clergy. Defendants' wrongful acts are ongoing and continuous.

The class-action suit accuses the Church of violating the federal Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, which was originally devised to target organized crime syndicates. It seeks to triple financial damages for "unlawful and intentional schemes, actions, inaction, omissions, cover-up, deception, and concealment, obstructive behavior regarding investigations, and conspiracy of silence," which "constitute assault, breach of fiduciary duty, negligence/gross negligence, negligence per se, intentional infliction of emotional distress, wrongful death, public nuisance, conspiracy, and aiding and abetting."

The class-action suit is historic, in that it attempts to hold the Vatican liable in the United States for the actions of its clergy — a first. Up to now, the Vatican has avoided liability by claiming it has no direct authority over clergy.

But this assertion was shattered on Monday when the Holy See blocked the USCCB vote in Baltimore.

"If that's not command responsibility, I don't know what is," said attorney Mitchell A. Toups, who is helping lead the class-action suit.
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Jennie Paluka says "report McGarvie to IBAC" 2 weeks 3 days ago #4213

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Priest sex abuse: New report lists 212 Catholic priests in Oakland, San Jose, San Francisco dioceses accused of child sex abuse

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A law firm released the names of 215 priests credibly accused of abusing children from the Archdiocese of San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose. Jeff Anderson & Associates released a 66-page report which included photos of a short synopsis of their alleged abuse. Pictured is Fr. Robert Ponciroli. Fr. Ponciroli was accused of child sexual abuse in 2002 when a man reported to the police that he was sexually abused by Fr. Ponciroli at the Cathedral in approximately 1973 to 1974. In 1975, the parents of two boys at St. Cornelius, reported to the Bishop that Fr. Ponciroli had sexually abused their two sons. Other reports suggested to authorities that Fr. Ponciroli was “too free with boys, especially altar boys.” In 2002, Fr. Ponciroli was named in a civil lawsuit alleging he sexually abused a boy in approximately 1980 while at St. Ignatius. Fr. Ponciroli was removed from ministry in 1995 after being named in a lawsuit alleging he sexually abused someone in the 1970s. Records in Fr. Ponciroli’s priest file show that his superiors knew of sexual misconduct allegations as early as 1975. In 2003, Fr. Ponciroli was arrested and charged with molesting two altar boys in the 1980s, however the charges were dropped in 2003 after a California Supreme Court ruling. There are at least seven known child sex abuse victims of Fr. Ponciroli. It is believed Fr. Ponciroli died in approximately 2009 and was last known to be living in Florida. From 1999 until his alleged death in 2009, Fr. Ponciroli’s status as a priest and whether he had access to children are unknown. (Courtesy of Jeff Anderson and Associates)
By Matthias Gafni | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Julia Prodis Sulek | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., John Woolfolk | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and David DeBolt | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: October 23, 2018 at 10:02 am | UPDATED: October 26, 2018 at 4:51 pm

A correction to an earlier version of this article has been appended to the end of the article.

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As Bay Area Catholic leaders are increasingly under pressure to name priests accused of abusing children, a Minnesota law firm published a report Tuesday identifying 212 priests in the San Jose, Oakland and San Francisco dioceses accused of sexual misconduct involving kids..

The report names 135 accused offenders in the Archdiocese of San Francisco, 95 in the Oakland diocese and 33 in the San Jose diocese, though 51 names are duplicates because some of the priests worked in more than one Bay Area diocese. Earlier this month, the San Jose diocese released its own list of credibly accused priests that had only 15 names, which this report calls “deficient.”

Jeff Anderson & Associates, a law firm that has represented a number of Catholic priest abuse victims in California and elsewhere, compiled the 66-page report, which included the mugshots of priests, their parish work history and a short synopsis of their alleged abuse.
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“The data reveals the scandalous scale of hundreds of priests assaulting thousands of minors from early history to the present in these Dioceses,” the report concludes. “The data collected suggests the patterns and practices of Church officials, including the orchestration of an institutional cover-up of an enormous magnitude.”

The law firm acknowledges that the “vast majority” of the claims against the priests named in the report have been settled or not fully evaluated in civil court. Therefore, they say “the allegations should be considered just allegations and should not be considered proved or substantiated in a court of law.” They further describe how they compiled the names from media reports, the priest abuse database on BishopAccountability.org, dioceses’ own public statements and other sources.

For example, the Oakland Diocese in 2004 released a list of 24 credibly accused priests, and an investigation by this news organization in 2008 reported that 64 priests who had served in the East Bay had been accused of sexual abuse, either while working within the Oakland Diocese or at another outside the area. The investigation noted if a priest was named in a lawsuit, internal church records or another one of the thousands of documents reviewed. All but one of those was included in the law firm’s list Tuesday.
Jeff Anderson points out photos of San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone, from left, Oakland Bishop Michael Barber and San Jose Bishop Patrick McGrath during a press conference by Jeff Anderson & Associates law firm in San Francisco, Calif., on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. The law firm is suing the California Catholic of Bishops and published a report naming 263 priests in the San Jose, Oakland and San Francisco dioceses accused of sexual misconduct involving kids. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

One of the most egregious abusers on the list is Stephen Kiesle, a priest who was placed on three year’s probation in 1978 for molesting two boys at Our Lady of the Rosary in Union City and was later arrested and charged with molesting three girls at Santa Paula in Fremont in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He was was allowed to continue serving in a number of Bay Area parishes and ministries until the mid-1980s before being defrocked in 1987. He was sentenced in 2004 to six years in prison for abusing a 15-year old girl.

New on the list is Milton Eggerling, a priest who was accused of sexually abusing a boy in Austin, Texas, from 1973 to 1978. Before leaving for Texas, Eggerling was at Corpus Christi in Piedmont. He returned to Oakland in 1980 and later worked at the San Jose Diocese and at St. Patrick’s Church in Rodeo. He died in 2008. Anthony Rodrigue of the Dominican order served at St. Albert’s Priory in Oakland but was not named as an abuser by the Oakland diocese in 2004 despite having been sentenced in 1998 to 10 years in prison for abusing youth in Southern California before he came to the East Bay.

At least eight priests’ only East Bay connection was attending or being stationed at the Jesuit Theology Seminary in Berkeley.

On the law firm’s list connected to the San Jose Diocese, some names that did not appear in the diocese’s own report last week were already well-known offenders who were not parish priests but had a connection to the San Jose area. For others, there appears to be either no connection to the San Jose diocese or a tenuous one.

The San Jose diocese released a statement Tuesday saying they are reviewing the names on the list and will comment Wednesday.

“It is heart-breaking to see the list of so many who have betrayed and abused innocent children in these horrific ways in the list released today by Anderson & Associates,” the statement said. “Diocese of San Jose remains resolute in our commitment to provide healing and reconciliation for the victims/survivors. This will allow us to begin the process of restoring trust that has been painfully eroded by those in positions of leadership and trust by being accountable and transparent for what has happened in the past within the Diocese of San Jose.”
Jeff Anderson, left, pauses as Patrick Wall, as predator priest hunter, shows the report naming 263 priests during a press conference by Jeff Anderson & Associates law firm in San Francisco, Calif., on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. The law firm published a report naming 263 priests in the San Jose, Oakland and San Francisco dioceses accused of sexual misconduct involving kids. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

The new report shows a list of priests accused locally and elsewhere over the decades ended up at two South Bay retirement homes — the MaryKnoll retirement house in Los Altos and the Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in Los Gatos.

They include Jerold Lindner, spiritual adviser for a lay organization called Christian Family Movement, who was accused of molesting boys at a religious camp in the Santa Cruz Mountains in the 1970s. One case made headlines in 2016, when one of his accusers, Will Lynch, attacked Lindner at the Jesuit Center where he was living. A jury later acquitted Lynch of assault.

William Farrington, a Jesuit accused in 2012 of molesting a Bellarmine College Preparatory School student in the 1960s, also lived at the Jesuit Center. Farrington was disciplined by the Jesuit order and banned from working with minors, according to a Mercury News report at the time.

The late John Rodriguez Moniz, also from the Los Gatos retirement home, had been convicted of lewd conduct with a young girl for a 1991 incident while visiting St. Mary’s parish in Los Gatos, also reported by the Mercury News. Joseph E. Avery lived at the MaryKnoll retirement center from 1994 to 1996. In 2016, Avery was reportedly named in a lawsuit alleging he had sexually abused a boy while serving in parishes in Honolulu and Hilo, Hawaii, in the 1970s. Avery died in 1997.

Two priests who had brief stints at the campus ministry program at Santa Clara University in the 1970s and 1980s also were accused of sex crimes while working out of state. James F. Kuntz pleaded guilty to possession of child pornography in 2008 while in New Jersey, according to published reports, and Edward Buenter was accused in a civil lawsuit of abusing four boys in the late 1960s.

In a statement, Santa Clara University said it supports “the release of the names and statuses of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse.” It also said it would “cooperate with any lawful investigation.”

The Oakland diocese has vowed to release a list of priests credibly accused of child sex abuse, and the San Francisco archdiocese has hinted that it also is looking at doing a similar self-reporting. The Oakland report is expected late next month. It’s not clear what effect the law firm’s disclosure — or previous reporting — will have on Oakland’s report.

Oakland diocese spokeswoman Helen Osman said she could not comment on Tuesday’s report while it prepares its own list.

“We are actively reviewing files,” Osman said. “We don’t have a definitive date yet for the release, but I am anticipating immediately after Thanksgiving.”

In 2004, the San Francisco archdiocese named 56 abusive priests, significantly less than the 135 named in Tuesday’s report. Spokesman Mike Brown said the San Francisco Archdiocese plans to look “carefully” at the names released by the law firms.

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone has not yet decided if he’ll follow bishops in San Jose and Oakland, who are releasing names. Brown said the church is “going through our files,” and Cordileone is holding listening tours with parishioners. A decision could come “in the next month or even shorter,” Brown said.

At a San Francisco news conference Tuesday, Anderson spoke about the lawsuit filed earlier this month against every California diocese asking for the church to turn over their books.
Beatriz Mendoza speaks during a press conference against the California Catholic of Bishops by Jeff Anderson & Associates law firm in San Francisco, Calif., on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. The law firm published a report naming 263 priests in the San Jose, Oakland and San Francisco dioceses accused of sexual misconduct involving kids. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

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Stephen Kiesle asked to be removed as priest after abuse conviction, but future Pope, Oakland diocese let him linger
Survivor accuses Oakland Diocese of sheltering abusive priest
‘We have nothing to hide’: Oakland diocese to release names of all priests credibly accused of sexually abusing minors
San Jose diocese names 15 priests accused of abuse

“The bishops made a conscious choice to protect those offenders, but they also made a conscious choice to protect themselves and officials complicit in their crimes,” said Anderson, who earlier this month released a report naming 307 offenders in the Los Angeles diocese.

Patrick Wall, a former priest who works with the Minnesota law firm and helped compile the list, said the names were pulled from public sources.

“This is a secret sitting right in front of their eyes through open sources,” he said. “That’s what drives me nuts.”

The report comes in the wake of a scathing Pennsylvania grand jury report about abuse in several diocese there, as well as more and more law enforcement agencies across the country launching their own probes. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra has a policy of not confirming whether his office has opened an investigation, but several Bay Area victim advocates said they met with senior staff from the AG’s office on Sept. 26 in the state building in Oakland.

“They told us that they didn’t have the same powers as the AG in (Pennsylvania), but they seemed concerned, and they asked us for additional information on a couple of topics,” said Melanie Sakoda, a member of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests.

“They asked good questions and clearly were tuned into the situation,” SNAP official and priest abuse victim Dan McNevin said. “They shared that they had already been in touch with dozens of other states about the status of those investigations.”
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Xavier Becerra link to pedo priest task force 2 weeks 3 days ago #4214

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RICO applies to Pope: Plaintiffs 2 weeks 2 days ago #4216

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U.S. Catholic church hit with two national lawsuits by sex-abuse victims
Class-action suit names Holy See in Vatican as defendant, cites federal racketeering laws
By Tom Jackman
November 14, 2018

Two groups of victims of sexual abuse by Catholic clergy members have launched simultaneous lawsuits against the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, with one class-action suit also naming the Holy See as a defendant. The suit accuses the Catholic church of conspiracy and operating a continuing criminal enterprise under federal racketeering statutes and attempts to be the first to hold the Vatican liable in the United States for the actions of its clergy.

The suits demand that the church produce the names of all accused sex offenders listed in the church’s secret archives nationwide. Both suits were filed Tuesday, apparently by coincidence, the lawyers said. But the class-action suit, filed in federal court in the District, also seeks financial damages for assault, gross negligence, emotional distress and wrongful death, for the families of those who committed suicide after being abused by a priest or other Catholic official. And the class action seeks to triple those financial damages under the federal Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO, originally written to target organized crime but appropriate for a church accused of “cheating and defrauding Plaintiffs and Class members out of their childhood, youth, innocence, virginity, families, jobs, finances, assets — in short, their lives,” according to the lawsuit.

The suit filed in the District notes that the Holy See has successfully avoided liability in the United States by claiming it did not have direct authority over priests. But then on Monday, as the bishops were meeting at their national conference in Baltimore to address the issue, they were directed by a letter from the Vatican to stop the discussion, and did. “If that’s not command responsibility, I don’t know what is,” said Mitchell A. Toups, one of the lead attorneys in the class-action case.

[Vatican tells U.S. bishops not to vote on proposals to tackle sexual abuse, spurns outside investigations]

The second suit, filed in federal court in Minnesota on behalf of six men, was announced Wednesday at a news conference in Baltimore. It was filed by attorney Jeffrey R. Anderson of St. Paul, Minn., who said he has filed thousands of legal actions against the church since 1983 on behalf of abuse victims. One of the plaintiffs in the suit, Joseph McLean of St. Paul, said he agreed to be publicly named in the suit “to force the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to come clean and do the right thing.”

Judy Keane, a spokeswoman for the conference of bishops, said the bishops would not comment on pending litigation. The Holy See, which is the government of the Catholic church, based in Vatican City, and maintains the equivalent of an embassy in Washington, did not respond to a request for comment.

The six plaintiffs in each suit are men from different states around the country, and the suits do not discuss the individual abuse any of the plaintiffs suffered. The class-action suit, instead, revisits the church’s centuries of both child abuse and its supposed steps to halt it, starting in A.D. 306, when a council in Spain “passed the first formal legislation condemning child sexual abuse by the clergy, including sexual abuse of boys.” By 1917, the Holy See formally made it a crime for clergy to have sex with children under the age of 16, and subsequent church laws further codified that ban.

In 1962, the Holy See privately circulated a new set of procedures for dealing with clergy sexual abuse, which the class-action lawsuit said required bishops to refrain from reporting such crimes to local authorities. When the document became public in 2003, Catholic officials said it only mandated secrecy within the church investigative process of certain cases and did not prohibit reporting to civil authorities.

By that time, thousands of cases of abuse had occurred, and accused priests had merely been shifted to other dioceses.

Bishops begin an electronic voting process on the third and final day of the 2018 U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops general assembly in Baltimore on Wednesday. (Theresa Keil/Reuters)

The class-action suit attempts to hold the Vatican responsible for the first time under the legal concept of “respondeat superior,” that a supervisory body is responsible for the actions of its employees. “It’s a military thing,” Toups said. “The command has responsibility for its troops.” He noted that financial settlements paid to victims of clergy abuse “have to go up the chain of command” within the church for final approval.

Toups said the class-action suit could serve as a one-stop national clearinghouse to resolve all cases of abuse, rather than through a series of local suits. The suit estimates the proposed class may consist of over 5,000 members, whose names are already known to the church. In addition to financial damages, the suit seeks a declaratory judgment that the church must discipline and report known offenders; institute policies of transparency, to include publishing the names of all offenders; and create protocols to prevent or effectively handle future episodes of abuse.

Under state law, most states have statutes of limitations on civil actions of no more than five years, though some states have exceptions for child sexual abuse claims. The class-action suit argues that the statutes of limitations should be tolled because of “fraudulent concealment”: that the church kept its offenses secret.

One of the plaintiffs in the Minnesota suit, Phillip DiWilliams, said at the news conference that his own suit against the church in Philadelphia was dismissed in 2011 when the church successfully argued his claims were barred by the state statute of limitations. He urged reporters to continue publicizing the reports of clergy abuse. “They’re not going to stop,” DiWilliams said of the church, “until somebody stops them.”

Thompson, the lawyer in the Minnesota case, said that after decades of bringing suits against the Catholic church, “It’s awful that we have to be as active as we are. But it’s a good journey to sit with survivors and whistleblowers, doing something to protect kids, knowing they [the church] are not.”

Staff writer Michelle Boorstein contributed to this report.
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Pope: 2 weeks 5 hours ago #4218

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To those who abuse minors I would say this: convert and hand yourself over to human justice, and prepare for divine justice. Remember the words of Christ: “Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea. Woe to the world because of scandals! For it is necessary that scandals come, but woe to the man by whom the scandal comes!” (Mt 18:6-7).

We are also experiencing a new age of martyrs. It seems that the cruel and vicious persecution of the Roman Empire has not yet ended. A new Nero is always being born to oppress believers solely because of their faith in Christ. New extremist groups spring up and target churches, places of worship, ministers and members of the faithful. Cabals and cliques new and old live by feeding on hatred and hostility to Christ, the Church and believers. How many Christians even now bear the burden of persecution, marginalization, discrimination and injustice throughout our world. Yet they continue courageously to embrace death rather than deny Christ. How difficult it is, even today, freely to practice the faith in all those parts of the world where religious freedom and freedom of conscience do not exist.

The sins and crimes of consecrated persons are further tainted by infidelity and shame; they disfigure the countenance of the Church and undermine her credibility. The Church herself, with her faithful children, is also a victim of these acts of infidelity and these real sins of “peculation”.

Dear brothers and sisters,
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Let it be clear that before these abominations the Church will spare no effort to do all that is necessary to bring to justice whosoever has committed such crimes. The Church will never seek to hush up or not take seriously any case. It is undeniable that some in the past, out of irresponsibility, disbelief, lack of training, inexperience – we need to judge the past with a hermeneutics of the past – or spiritual and human myopia, treated many cases without the seriousness and promptness that was due. That must never happen again. This is the choice and the decision of the whole Church.

This coming February, the Church will restate her firm resolve to pursue unstintingly a path of purification. She will question, with the help of experts, how best to protect children, to avoid these tragedies, to bring healing and restoration to the victims, and to improve the training imparted in seminaries. An effort will be made to make past mistakes opportunities for eliminating this scourge, not only from the body of the Church but also from that of society. For if this grave tragedy has involved some consecrated ministers, we can ask how deeply rooted it may be in our societies and in our families. Consequently, the Church will not be limited to healing her own wounds, but will seek to deal squarely with this evil that causes the slow death of so many persons, on the moral, psychological and human levels.
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