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  • artinsurance created a new topic ' Insurance' in the forum.
    Engagement Ring Insurance - Since 2008, Charles has been involving in private and corporate art and jewellery insurance, art gallery insurance, auction house insurance, museum art insurance, art exhibition and transit insurance. He provides art advisory service including art management and valuation.

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    6 hours 56 minutes ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic ANZ's John Dahlsen: Claw it back; in the forum
    NewsNational

    Ex-ANZ director's radical plan to fix Australia's banks
    7:04am May 21, 2018
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    1:04
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    John Dahlsen on Australia's banking culture

    John Dahlsen on Australia's banking cultureNOW
    John Dahlsen on Australia's banking culture
    The Teller - Part Two
    The Teller - Part Two
    The Teller - Part One
    The Teller - Part One
    Holy Real Estate
    Holy Real Estate
    Sneak Peek: The world's most ancient turf war | Sunday on 60 Minutes
    Sneak Peek: The world's most ancient turf war | Sunday on 60 Minutes
    Sneak Peek: Australia's bad banks | Sunday on 60 Minutes
    Sneak Peek: Australia's bad banks | Sunday on 60 Minutes
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part five
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part five
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part three
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part three
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part two
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part two
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part one
    MH370: The Situation Room - Part one
    Sneak Peek: What happened to MH370?
    Sneak Peek: What happened to MH370?
    How Daryl Floyd has persevered in the search for his brother's body
    How Daryl Floyd has persevered in the search for his brother's body
    Driven to drink - Part two
    Driven to drink - Part two
    Driven to drink - Part one
    Driven to drink - Part one
    Sneak peek: Driven to drink | Sunday on 60 Minutes
    Sneak peek: Driven to drink | Sunday on 60 Minutes
    100 Million dollar baby - Part two
    100 Million dollar baby - Part two
    100 Million dollar baby - Part one
    100 Million dollar baby - Part one
    Pay up
    Pay up
    Striking a nerve - Part two
    Striking a nerve - Part two
    Striking a nerve - Part one
    Striking a nerve - Part one

    Written by former ANZ director John Dalshen.

    There’s anger in the streets about what’s coming out of the Royal Commission into the banks.

    And who could blame people for wanting to see heads roll, from the top.
    A former director of ANZ has come up with a radical plan to help fix the banking problems in Australia. Picture: 60 Minutes
    A former director of ANZ has come up with a radical plan to help fix the banking problems in Australia. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Ex-ANZ director John Dalshen says the high flyers in the banks should give their bonuses back. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Ex-ANZ director John Dalshen says the high flyers in the banks should give their bonuses back. Picture: 60 Minutes

    I would prefer to see the senior figures of Australian banking give back the extravagant bonuses and the massive salaries. I’m convinced this will not only garner public support – it might also improve the share price.

    The Teller: The toxic culture of the banking sector revealed

    Those working in the frontline of banking, at a local branch, are feeling the heat from an angry public. But it’s not fair to blame them.

    They’re operating in a system of sales targets and incentives designed by other people. And naturally those other people are further up the chain of command.
    Liz Hayes and Mr Dalshen spoke about the problems with the banking sector that have been laid bare by the royal commission. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Liz Hayes and Mr Dalshen spoke about the problems with the banking sector that have been laid bare by the royal commission. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Related Articles

    Life-long hush agreements reveal toxic culture in banking sector
    AMP directors quit amid banking royal commission findings
    Commonwealth Bank admits to losing almost 20 million bank account records

    There are many things that need to happen to restore trust in Australia’s banks. A good start would be for boards and senior executive staff to take a meaningful cut in take-home pay.

    Some of the packages paid to CEOs and others at the top of the tree are mind-boggling. And as the banking Royal Commission has heard, a terrible culture of greed, deceit and pressure has taken hold.

    So my call is to give it back – now.

    But there’s also room for other constructive changes.
    Former bank teller, Catherine* told 60 Minutes her profit-driven workplace culture became unbearable. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Former bank teller, Catherine* told 60 Minutes her profit-driven workplace culture became unbearable. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Non-disparagement deeds are usually secret and they last a lifetime. They have a chilling effect on public debate.
    Non-disparagement deeds are usually secret and they last a lifetime. They have a chilling effect on public debate.

    The banking industry is competitive and ultimately senior staff and boards are accountable to the market, particularly the big funds investors who are making decisions on where to get the best return for superannuants, for example.

    But the need for high returns cannot mean that we turn a blind eye to behaviour which is morally or legally wrong. This is a test for our community.

    There’s a good argument, too, that there is too much regulation of the banks. This might seem to go against getting accountability and honesty in the system, but the truth is that the cost of regulation is high and it may not be the best way to get integrity back into the system.
    Head of the Finance Sector Union, Julia Angrisano. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Head of the Finance Sector Union, Julia Angrisano. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Ms Angrisano told reporter Liz Hayes non-disparagement deeds have the potential to influence what stories are heard in the current Financial Services Royal Commission. Picture: 60 Minutes
    Ms Angrisano told reporter Liz Hayes non-disparagement deeds have the potential to influence what stories are heard in the current Financial Services Royal Commission. Picture: 60 Minutes

    A more effective approach would be to have more, smaller banks than just four huge banks who are effectively a law unto themselves. Having more also creates stronger competition.

    Thirdly, it is good the penalties have increased substantially to reflect the gravity of the crime. Plenty of people have gone to gaol for way less than some of the behaviour we’ve seen playing out at the Royal commission.

    The Royal Commission will hopefully get beyond airing dirty laundry, as important as that is, and move to ensure that there is genuine change so that we never again see the collapse in trust we’ve witnessed. However getting meaningful change is by no means assured.
    The banks are preparing for another week of intense grilling at the royal commission this week. Picture: 60 Minutes
    The banks are preparing for another week of intense grilling at the royal commission this week. Picture: 60 Minutes

    The banks have a very powerful lobby in Canberra. Recall that it was only when the banks agreed to a Royal Commission that Prime Minister Turnbull went along with it – even though it was obvious that a powerful inquiry was inevitable.

    In some ways, getting it right is very simple. The yardstick needs to be what you would tolerate being done to you or your family. Is it acceptable to sell you something you don’t need? There’s no doubt that the system of extravagant bonuses has warped some fundamental human decency.

    I encourage you to join me in my campaign to bring honesty back to banking – starting with having bankers give back the money they should never have accepted.

    To watch ‘The Teller’ in full and for more on 60 Minutes, head to: www.9now.com.au/60-minutes

    Read More...
    11 hours 15 minutes ago
  • The legal services board were so appalled at what the bank's lawyers get away with, it said to see the FBI. I thought they were insane but I did anyway. The FBI jumped out of the bushes on international bribes that conned American retirement funds according to the US International Corruption Prosecutor Eileen Decker, wrote Elliot Sgargetta to Parliament and US law agencies.



    Banking royal commission: CBA reputation set for another battering

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    Over the next two weeks the royal commission will turn to the way banks, including CBA, treat small and medium-sized ...
    Over the next two weeks the royal commission will turn to the way banks, including CBA, treat small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) customers, including farmers. Michael Clayton Jones
    Adele Ferguson AFR Woodcut

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    by Adele Ferguson

    As the Commonwealth Bank reels from a school banking scandal where thousands of children's bank accounts were fraudulently activated by staff as part of a widespread scam to meet aggressive performance targets and earn bonuses, its reputation is set for another battering in round three of the royal commission.

    Over the next two weeks the royal commission will turn to the way banks, including CBA, treat small and medium sized enterprise (SME) customers, including farmers.

    As Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman Kate Carnell told The Australian Financial Review in January: "The pub test is whether the public will find the actions of the banks unreasonable, unethical or even unconscionable."

    Banks behaving badly and acting unethically has become a common theme over the past few years and is why we are in the midst of a royal commission.
    "The pub test is whether the public will find the actions of the banks unreasonable, unethical or even unconscionable," ...
    "The pub test is whether the public will find the actions of the banks unreasonable, unethical or even unconscionable," Kate Carnell said. Louie Douvis

    The school banking and customer referral rorting scandals exposed by Fairfax Media at the weekend, highlight a different dimension of poor bank ethics and culture where staff were caught cheating the bank using teller discrepancy funds or processing valueless deposits to activate school accounts for targets and bonuses – no matter how small. They also faked customer referrals to meet targets.
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    When the scandal emerged inside the bank in 2013, a decision was taken not to take any punitive action against staff on the basis it was "somewhat commonplace". An email described the practice as "widespread" and "it would seem unfair to name a handful when more are involved". This was despite it being fraudulent and in breach of the Code of Banking Practice. Parents weren't told, schools weren't told and the board and the regulator weren't told until recently.

    The Finance Sector Union issued a statement saying "this is about a sales culture at all costs. It is more evidence that the sales culture within banks is rotten."

    CBA chief executive Matt Comyn, who was running the retail bank in 2013, when the misconduct was detected, said: "While this practice did not financially harm any of our customers, it was a breach of their trust. For that I'm deeply sorry. As CBA's new chief executive, my number one priority is to expedite changes that will prevent any behaviour that undermines our customers' trust in us – and to remove any CBA employee who knowingly acts against our customers' interests."
    Chilling accusation
    CBA chief executive Matt Comyn apologised for the gaming of Dollarmites accounts by branch staff.
    CBA chief executive Matt Comyn apologised for the gaming of Dollarmites accounts by branch staff. Louis Douvis

    Between now and the end of the royal commission, the public will hear a lot more public apologies from financial institutions, including CBA, for poor behaviour.

    None more than the way banks have treated SMEs over the years. Ross Waraker, a marketing researcher specialising in brand, strategy and advertising, has been tireless in his quest to get to the bottom of what went on after a friend who owned a pub in Sydney, The Sandringham Hotel, became a victim of CBA's BankWest in 2012. The pub was put into receivership, despite never missing an interest payment.

    Such allegations have dogged CBA since it took over Bankwest in October 2008 for $2.1 billion during the global financial crisis. In a 2012 senate inquiry into post-GFC banking, more than 150 submissions were received from Bankwest customers who relayed stories of how the bank had "engineered" defaults by getting the loan revalued to change the loan to value ratio.

    Then in March 2014 the allegations flared up again when Alan Eggleston, who at the time was a Liberal senator, accused CBA of deliberately defaulting some of Bankwest's business to "claw back the acquisition price and prevent its funding costs from rising due to global banking rules".

    He told parliament that information brought to his attention could conclude that "CBA had a predetermined outcome it needed to achieve, and it opportunistically capitalised on Bankwest's dire financial situation by manufacturing defaults on certain customers to engineer the result that it wanted".

    "If it is true that the CBA got a price reduction exactly equal to the gross value of impaired loans in 2008 then this means CBA paid zero cents in the dollar for those impaired loans," Eggleston said.

    It was a chilling accusation that CBA vigorously denied, as well as denying any misconduct. But the speculation lingered and it is something many hope the royal commission will investigate to clear up one way or the other.

    In June 2015 a parliamentary inquiry reached conclusions handed down almost a year later that the banks might not have acted illegally when throwing small business customers to the wall, but they did behave unconscionably.
    Time to slow down

    Waraker, who has established White Collar Crime Reform, gave evidence to the parliamentary inquiry and referred to a submission by Hall Partners that he said "detailed a large number of victims that the CBA deliberately and systematically financially distressed and then constructively defaulted over 1000 performing Bankwest commercial loans to the value of at least $8.2 billion, following the acquisition of Bankwest by the CBA."

    CBA denied the allegations and the committee never got to the bottom of it.

    The committee concluded that CBA "consistently denied that there have been issues with their conduct and how it engaged with customers. The evidence of witnesses and submitters to this inquiry has strongly called into question the Commonwealth Bank's denial of unreasonable or unethical conduct."

    Fast-forward to 2018 and Waraker has made a submission to the royal commission. He told the Financial Review he hoped the royal commission has enough time and resources to research and prepare adequate case studies, which fully expose the banks conduct in respect of these loans.

    He also hoped that the bank would finally acknowledge the conduct and quickly agree to compensate victims.

    Nationals Senator John Williams, who has sat on the various parliamentary hearings and helped a number of people and farmers who banks sold up – or would have been sold up without his intervention – said over the years there have been many cases were assets were sold at firesale prices, even if the customers hadn't missed an interest payment.

    He said it made a mockery of section 420(a) of the Corporations Act, which requires receivers to seek the maximum value when selling assets. He hoped the royal commission would look into it.

    He said some of the issues raised in the 2015 parliamentary inquiry were too much to get into given time constraints.

    The royal commission is also working to a short timeline to investigate such a complex, opaque and powerful industry. It is tearing through institution after institution at lightning speed. It needs to slow down, extend the deadline and give more victims a voice to be heard.

    Read More...
    13 hours 15 minutes ago
  • Royal commission to focus on small business lending as banks troop back to the witness box
    By business reporter Daniel Ziffer

    Posted about 2 hours ago
    The Commissioner Kenneth Hayne presides over the hearing
    Photo: No rest for the allegedly wicked. Royal commissioner Kenneth Hayne turns his steely gaze to the banks dealing with small business in his next round of hearings. (AAP: Edie Jim)
    Related Story: Royal commission sheds light on 'closed door deals' between ASIC and banks

    The banking royal commission has been big. It's about to get small.

    Small and medium enterprises are the focus of the next fortnight of hearings, beginning on Monday.

    Karen Fairweather of Hoot Cards and Gifts in Melbourne's central business district is looking forward to an examination of merchant fees — the cost of transactions.

    "The biggest issue for us is EFPTOS fees. You get charged so much for each transaction, every single time," she said.

    Electronic funds transfer at point of sale (EFTPOS) and new tap and go technology can be great for consumers, but tough for retailers who must absorb the cost.
    ASIC missing in action

    ASIC is the law enforcement agency that shies away from enforcement, particularly at the top end of town, writes Ian Verrender.

    A report written for the royal commission noted EFTPOS as an issue.

    "Some businesses and representative bodies have noted the cost pressures imposed by payment systems, which may disproportionately impact SMEs that lack economies of scale," the report said.

    Shopping around for a better deal doesn't work, Ms Fairweather added.

    "We've tried and tried. They're obviously all talking to each other. They've made it hard to get a look in," she said.
    Bank forced 'fire sales'
    Nationals Senator John Williams during Question Time in the Senate chamber at Parliament House in Canberra.
    Photo: Nationals Senator John 'Wacka' Williams says banks have been guilty of driving the "fire sales" small businesses and famers. (AAP: Mick Tsikas)

    Nationals senator John Williams strongly advocated for a banking royal commission, to the irritation of some of his colleagues.

    He expects the behaviour of Commonwealth Bank subsidiary Bankwest — and the selling of seized assets at "fire sale" prices — to be a key focus of the hearings.

    "One thing that's become very clear to us over the years, is that when small businesses are sold up sometimes their assets are sold out very cheap, way below their value," he said, rattling off examples of $3.8 million farms sold for $800,000, and asset values halved, then sold low before being revalued at the original valuation.

    "I think the biggest shock will be the price assets are sold for. There will be ridiculous prices paid for assets, far, far below their proper value."

    There are five topics, with different groups and institutions forced to answer questions about them.

    Let's go through each of the five topics in turn (even though previous hearings haven't always stuck to the order they'd set out at the start).

    First up is "responsible lending to small businesses". We'll hear from ANZ, frequent fliers Commonwealth Bank, Westpac and for the first time: Suncorp and Bank of Queensland
    Next is the "approach of banks to enforcement, management and monitoring of loans to businesses". That sounds to me like the "calling in" of mortgages and overdrafts, which has been a controversial practice that has created a lot of aggrieved small businesses. Who must answer for that? The Commonwealth Bank, Bankwest and NAB
    Then it's "product and account administration". Could be anything. Your guess is better than mine. CBA (three from three!) and Westpac will field a witness on this topic.
    Penultimately, the "extension of unfair contract terms legislation to small business contracts" will be scoped out by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC). After some searing exchanges during their appearances in the last hearing, this will be insightful.
    Finally, the "Code of Banking Practice" will be examined. The Australian Banking Association, almost certainly represented by CEO Anna Bligh, the former premier of Queensland who has held the role since last year. ASIC will also have a say.

    Council of Small Business Australia deputy chair David Gandolfo agrees that Bankwest will be a hot topic, but doesn't expect the shock and awe of the most recent hearings.
    Banking probe poorly judged

    The Government's misjudgement on the need for a banking royal commission has come back to bite it, writes Michelle Grattan.

    But then again, it would be hard to top revelations that the nation's largest bank, the Commonwealth, knowingly charged dead people fees for years, or that the AMP board appeared to meddle in a report then sent to the regulator as an independent summary of a scandal.

    "We're not going to see anything quite like what we saw in the first round in the second round and certainly not the degree of failure," Mr Gandolfo said.

    "I'm sure we'll read, we'll hear about CommBank and the acquisition of Bankwest and what happened to some of the borrowers subsequent to that, and a similar situation with ANZ and landmark and non-monetary defaults and people being default through no fault of their own."

    Mr Gandolfo said statistics of complaints to the Financial Ombudsman Service show there's no market failure when it comes to the relationship between banks and small business.
    Problems with access to credit

    But there are issues.

    "There is a problem with access to credit," Mr Gandolfo said.

    "A lot of business owners are frustrated, they go their bank, their bank can't help them or (just) extends their overdraft or extends their home loan, which is not the appropriate solution.

    "A lot of the time or if they can't get what they want from their bank, so they're going to fund their business on a credit card."

    For Senator Williams, the revelations of the first hearings have opened people's eyes to some of the systemic and cultural problems in large financial institutions.

    "I always say, life is about fairness, you must treat people fairly. So lying to ASIC! That is unbelievable," he said.

    "Ripping people off! What came out of the last hearings trashed AMP ... who knows what'll come out of the next one."

    You can follow Dan Ziffer's royal commission tweets @danziffer.

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    yesterday
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic ANZ stand over men? Channelnews Asia in the forum
    ANZ Bank Now Using Mobile Technology To Harrass Qantas Frequent Flyer Customers
    By David Richards| 15 May 2018
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    ANZ bank who are currently under investigation at the Banking Royal Commission is now using new mobile technology to hound Qantas Frequent Flyer customers, with automated telephone calls, to both land lines and mobile phones, in the past this bank were known to use standover men to chase down ANZ debtors.

    From early morning to late at night the ANZ bank is now calling customers who have missed a payment on their credit card using hidden number calling even for amounts as low as $25.

    They are also hitting the same customers being called with double digit interest on their cards, while also charging them a $20 late fee on top of the double-digit interest.

    At the same time their customers who want to query a card transaction are made to wait online for up to an hour.

    And if you are thinking of walking into an ANZ bank for some service as I did recently in an effort to cancel my ANZ card, forget it, as all the teller will do is pick up a phone and connect you with a call centre, where you once again have to wait in a queue.

    I have an ANZ Qantas Frequent Flyer credit card which I was using as a backup to my regular Westpac credit card.

    I did this when during a trip to New York my Westpac card was compromised at LA airport.

    Within an hour Westpac was on to the fact, that unauthorised payments were being made from my card, for the simple reason that their artificial intelligence built into their card security system, was telling them that some weeks prior I had used the credit card to pay for an airline ticket and right at the time of the two unauthorised transactions ,I was sitting on an aircraft between LA and New York.
    When I got to New York I was unable to use my Westpac card, so I got a back up card via a Qantas Frequent Flyer offer,the bank was ANZ.

    Recently I made a $454 transaction on my ANZ Visa card.

    And because I was overseas I did not get around to paying off the card immediately as I normally do.

    In the past I have paid down thousands within weeks of a transaction being made, whether it be for an airline payment or hotel or a subscription but this appears to make no difference with ANZ.

    Then came the ANZ calls day and night, it was pure automated harrasment, yesterday I got six calls in 6 hours.

    After paying down the $454 I decided to ditch the card.

    I tried to do it online but that was a waste of time and after 45 minutes I gave up and decided to visit my local North Sydney branch.

    After waiting for a bank teller, I was told that the teller could not cancel the card.

    He then made me sit and wait while he called the same call centre I had earlier given up on.

    And to make matters worse, the operator said that she could not cancel the card as the payment from my Westpac account earlier that day was not showing up I asked why the real-time funds transfer system between bank accounts, even from different institutions was not in place she did not have an answer.

    This is the same system that the ANZ bragged about back in October last year claiming that from January 2017, and due to a billion-dollar infrastructure upgrade.

    Customers of the big four banks and about 50 smaller institutions would automatically be able to use instant payments between the banks.

    Not so at the ANZ Bank who in the past have used known standover men to visit the homes of people who had fallen behind in their payments.

    Tom Erikson was a well-known Melbourne standover man who described himself as a private detective.

    Known to associate with criminals such as Christopher Dale Flannery who was a Painter and Docker known as “Rent A Kill” Erikson bragged to me on several occasions that he had access to banking information from the ANZ bank.

    He showed me confidential documents relating to individuals who were ANZ customers that that he was tasked to hunt down, he said that they were paying him a retailer and a performance fee for his work.

    Erikson was a thug who would use intimidation to collect debts.

    Chief risk officer of ANZ’s digital division Kylie Rixon which is the same division that is now using mobile phone technology to harass their customers recently revealed at the ANZ bank had provided financial advice that was not in customers’ best interest.

    Questioned at the Royal Commission over a 2015 compliance audit into the bank’s three main advice groups — ANZ Financial Planning, RI Advice and Millennium she admitted that one in every 20 pieces of advice given to customers failed to meet the requirement that the advice was likely to be in the best interest of the client.

    She was also asked: “What’s sampled in an audit is meant to be representative of what’s happening across the business?”

    “Yes, that’s true,” Ms Rixon replied.

    The audit, which looked at advice provided between June 2013 to June 2015, found 11 per cent of Millennium3 advisers and 6 per cent of ANZ Financial Planning advisers were rated at “high risk” of not providing appropriate advice.

    Ms Rixon described the assessment as “very regrettable” and admitted there were deficiencies in ANZ’s systems.

    The audit also found the number of cases where inappropriate advice was given dramatically jumped, despite a drop in the number of advisers.
    About Post Author
    David Richards
    David Richards has been writing about technology for more than 30 years. A former Fleet Street, Journalist He wrote the Award Winning Series on the Federated Ships Painters + Dockers Union for the Bulletin that led to a Royal Commission. He is also a Logie Winner. for Outstanding Contribution To TV Journalism with a story called The Werribee Affair. In 1997, he built the largest Australian technology media Company and prior to that the third largest PR Company that became the foundation Company for Ogilvy PR. Today he writes about technology and the impact on both business and consumers.
    www.channelnews.com.au/anz-bank-now-usin...nt-flyers-customers/

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    yesterday
  • Dnnis Sgargetta said they were terrified. The kleptocracy prosecutors of Razak will go through the ANZ.

    Read More...
    yesterday
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic Control Fraud in the forum
    www.macrobusiness.com.au/2018/04/abcs-th...tgage-control-fraud/

    ABC’s The Business slams Australia’s giant mortgage “control fraud”

    By Unconventional Economist in Australian Property, Featured Article

    at 10:15 am on April 27, 2018 | 33 comments

    In the wake of yesterday’s explosive revelations by UBS about systemic dodgy mortgage lending practices by Australia’s second biggest mortgage lender, Westpac, the founder of LF Economics, Lindsay David, was interviewed by ABC’s The Business to discuss the ramifications.
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    2 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic Wayne byer's committee knew in the forum

    Forwarded message from PY - Submissions <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
    Date: Fri, 22 Jan 2016 02:53:08 +0000
    From: PY - Submissions <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
    Subject: RE: TRIM: RBA Payment Card Review: Ravelo's confession about credit card collusion by lawyers for Amex Visa and Mastercard [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]
    To: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Thank you for your submission.

    From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. [This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]
    Sent: Thursday, 21 January 2016 1:00 PM
    To: PY - Submissions; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Cc: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Subject: TRIM: RBA Payment Card Review: Ravelo's confession about credit card collusion by lawyers for Amex Visa and Mastercard


    Dear Payment Card Surcharging Fees Review


    Over recent years, members of our group dealt with credit card issues, stacked rules at banker arbitration schemes lke FOS, and unethical lawyers in cahoots with lawyers in the banking sector.

    Our members are also among the 6,500 submissions on cards in the David Murray Review as well.

    Our members filed reports of suspicious lawyering with the American SEC' Office of the Whistleblower and our members were interviewed by FBI and SEC officials.

    As a result of a drug bust in Los Angeles (that might be connected to stories from a Tina Stagliano) and an IRS Audit Subpoena on 19 Decembre 2014 by IRS Special Agent Daniel Garrido, lawyers Keila Ravelo and Gary Friedman for American Express and Mastercard, confessed to credit card collusion against tens of thousands of shops like Walmart and Target and Home Depot and Restoration Warehouse and Italian Colors Restaurant in Oaklands California, near the IRS Office that raided Hewlett Packard's Larry Tomlinson because of their bribes.

    The Australian Reserve Bank documents were very prominent in that case called "US & 17 States v American Express, Mastercard International, Visa Card (and dozens of other parties), and the shares in Amex fell exactly (within .01%) as our members predicted on David Murray's "FSI" Review.

    The Legal Services Board and Commission's whistleblowers were very concerned about getting caught up in their bosses shennanigans and they admit their bosses leaked our information to someone who pretended he was a "Mr. Jones" and "Tom Courtney" and lawyers for bankers in Sydney.

    The leaking skitful LSBC staff were immediately named in reports at the American Securities and Exchange Commission's Office of the Whistleblower!

    The leaks were long before the drug raid and long before the IRS raid by IRS Agent Daniel Garrido started. The leaks were long before NSW Cybercrime stopped Jon Waldron and Keith Hunter fleeing at the airport

    Our members are shocked at the cover ups in the VLSB, as are lawyers from the Law Institute CEO & Ethics Office, Mrs Gwen Wallace and Mr Pearce, and local MPs like Kelvin Thomson and Robert Clark.

    Because Freidman confessed that the collusion made a card settlement for $2.3 billion in damages became Zero damages, we think the Legal Services Board & Commission breached our confidentiality and is liable under "Part 7" to credit card victims and shareholders in Mastercard and American Express and Visa Card.

    Ravelo also threatens to blow the whistle on more collusion by lawyers for credit cards.

    The LSBC shut down complaints against lawyers for banks about Libor type rate fixes. The LSBC shut down complaints about a pokie lobbyist and unlicensed lawyer called Mctaggart. The LSBC "lost" complaints from witnesses and the LSBC disagreed with Prosecutors in the American Express Collusion Case.

    Everyone at the LSBC handballed enquiries faster than a VFL Footballer because they didn't want to get saddled with a writ.

    We think you should investigate the collusion between lawyers for credit cards.

    Thank You

    Shareholders Foundation Division.

    Read More...
    2 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic homelessness skyrockets in the forum
    'An international embarrassment': More than 116,000 Australians now homeless
    By Stuart Marsh
    Mar 14th, 2018
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    More Australians are classified as being homeless than ever before, according to new data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

    More than 116,000 people were experiencing homelessness when the 2016 Census was conducted, an increase of 4.6 percent over the last five years.

    Homelessness included those who were living in severely crowded dwellings – where a home would require four extra bedrooms to fit its occupants – as well as those living in tents, improvised dwellings or sleeping on the street.

    READ MORE: The shockingly 'easy' way to make a Bitcoin

    READ MORE: 1977 Holden Torana to fetch $250,000 at auction

    (A homeless man in Brisbane, Friday, March 7, 2014. (AAP Image/Dan Peled))

    General Manager of Population and Social Statistics Dr Paul Jelfs said a concerning trend showed younger and older Australians were more likely to experience homelessness.

    "One quarter of all people experiencing homelessness in 2016 was aged between 20 and 30 years," said Jelfs.

    "On Census night, 8,200 people were estimated to be ‘sleeping rough’ in improvised dwellings, tents or sleeping out – an increase from 3.2 persons per 10,000 people in 2011 to 3.5 persons per 10,000 people in 2016."

    (A homeless man sleeps in the sunshine along the Yarra River as cold weather hits Melbourne, Monday, June 1, 2015. (AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy))

    People aged between 65 and 74 years experiencing homelessness increased to 27 persons per 10,000 people, up from 25 persons per 10,000 people in 2011.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people comprised over 20 percent of all homelessness, with more than two in three living in overcrowded dwellings.

    Recent migrants primarily from South-East Asia, North-East Asia, China and Afghanistan accounted for 15 percent of the homeless estimate.

    (The belongings and sleeping quarters of a homeless person are seen outside a carpark in central Sydney, Tuesday, March 31, 2015. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas))

    Mission Australia CEO James Toomey said he wasn't surprised by the alarming figures.

    "It is an international embarrassment caused by the long-term absence of a national co-ordinated plan and the lack of a serious commitment to building new social and affordable homes," said Toomey.

    "We cannot afford to ignore this situation any longer. Safe and secure housing provides the platform for children to attend school, adults to work, people to be healthy and communities to thrive."

    Toomey said Australia's soaring property prices were forcing Australians from lower socio-economic backgrounds out onto the street.

    "The housing market is not delivering for those on the lowest and even moderate incomes," said Toomey.
    "The lack of appropriate social and affordable housing is very clearly evidenced in the alarming rise in overcrowding, particularly in NSW, where the housing market has seen some of the most significant price rises."

    Read More...
    2 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic AMP shares dive after Royal Commission in the forum
    Banking royal commission: First day in court for shell-shocked AMP
    AAP
    Friday, 18 May 2018 2:04PM
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    Three law firms have announced investigations on behalf of shareholders after the company admitted to cheating clients and lying to the corporate regulator

    AMP has appeared in court for the first time to defend a class action brought on behalf of shareholders seeking damages after revelations at the banking royal commission trimmed more than $2 billion off its market value.

    AMP will file its defence to proceedings from law firm Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan in the NSW Supreme Court within two months.

    The wealth management giant, which admitted to charging clients fees for services they did not receive and then lied to the corporate watchdog about it, on Friday said it hopes other class action proceedings and three potential class actions it is facing can be consolidated before the court.

    AMP is due to face its second class action, brought by law firm Phi Finney McDonald, in the Federal Court in Melbourne on June 8, after its testimony at the royal commission sent shares spiralling to a six-year low.
    Brenner has become AMP's second high-profile casualty of the banking royal commission, following CEO Craig Meller out the door

    1:11 | 7 News
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    Brenner has become AMP's second high-profile casualty of the banking royal commission, following CEO Craig Meller out the door

    The financial services giant, which could face criminal charges for misleading the regulator, last week said it intends to “vigorously defend” both class actions.

    AMP shares were down 0.5 per cent to $3.91 at 11.45am.

    Read More...
    2 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic David Cohen in the forum
    What will ASIC make of Clayton Utz links in the bank royal commission
    AMP’s Brian Salter. Pic: Hollie Adams
    AMP’s Brian Salter. Pic: Hollie Adams

    The Australian
    12:00AM April 25, 2018
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    62
    Ticky Fullerton
    Sky News Business host
    @BizTicky

    When the proverbial hits the fan at a company, it’s always good to know that your lawyer, holder of many of your strategic secrets, is right there with you in the trenches.

    In AMP’s case, that would be Clayton Utz. Unfortunately for AMP, Clayton Utz looks to be back-peddling from the trenches. And maybe the folk at AMP deserve it.

    At issue is the so-called independent report that was sent to regulator ASIC and produced by Clayton Utz partner Nick Mavrakis. Remember that name. We know from the royal commission that the report went through a 25 drafts, with intervention from AMP’s internal counsel Brian Salter and the AMP board.

    Salter, who, by the way spent almost 20 years at Clayton Utz, most recently as the banking partner, has now been sent on leave.

    The Australian’s Margin Call column yesterday revealed that Salter was actually best man at former ASIC chairman Greg Medcraft’s wedding, before observing “it sure is cosy in financial services land”.

    Clayton Utz then clarified that the so-called independent Mavrakis report was not an independent report from Clayton Utz for the regulator; indeed, it was commissioned by the AMP board, its client, and only independent of AMP management.

    As such, presumably the report could be altered in any way as agreed between client and adviser.

    Clayton Utz executive partner Rob Cutler stated: “The terms of engagement stipulated the investigation was to be undertaken independent of management of the advice business being reviewed and under the instruction of the AMP board and its general counsel.

    “Clayton Utz notes AMP may address the commission further and it would be inappropriate for us to make any further comment at this time.”

    This leaves AMP vulnerable. What if we discover that there is correspondence from AMP to ASIC that described the report as “independent”?

    But matters get even cosier, involving the Commonwealth Bank and links to Clayton Utz and AMP.

    David Cohen is the current head of risk at the CBA, having recently moved from CBA’s general counsel. And he was AMP’s general counsel just before Brian Salter. And who has the CBA employed to assist the bank with the royal commission? Why, Clayton Utz of course!

    We asked CBA directly whether Nick Mavrakis, the author of the AMP “independent report”, was acting for the bank in the royal commission. The bank confirmed that Clayton Utz was indeed acting for the bank, but declined to talk about specific individuals.

    And if you head to Nick Mavrakis’ Clayton Utz partner page, you’ll find that Mr Mavrakis has acted for CBA and Colonial First State in ASIC investigations, including Storm Financial and class actions.

    I wonder what the new chairman of ASIC James Shipton would make of all this. He’d be excused for being a little shell-shocked.

    Ticky Fullerton hosts Ticky weekdays on Sky News Business at 5.30pm.
    Ticky Fullerton
    Sky News Business host
    @BizTicky
    Ticky Fullerton anchors Ticky, weeknights on SKY NEWS Business, where she joined the team in 2017. Prior to this Ticky presented the ABC's national business show, The Business and Business PM on radio. In over twenty years with the broadcaster, she was both a prize winning investigative reporter with Four Corners, a political reporter in Canberra and also the presenter for the national farming program Landline. Previously, she was an associate director with investment bank Credit Suisse First Boston and spent ten years with the bank in both London and Sydney.

    Read More...
    3 days ago
  • Regulators’ culture in question

    The Australian 12:00am May 17, 2018

    Richard Gluyas



    Poor culture in large corporations has never been under more intense scrutiny, with the damning review of Commonwealth Bank by an APRA panel and the extraordinary implosion of AMP in the wake of last month’s royal commission hearings on financial advice.

    But what of the culture inside our regulators and powerful quasi-judicial bodies, such as the industry funded Financial Ombudsman Service?

    As the Australian Financial Complaints Authority — the one-stop shop for all financial complaints and disputes — absorbs FOS and starts hearing complaints by November 1, there are serious, lingering concerns about the discovery of inaccurate file notes made in 2015 by a senior FOS official, Justi Tonti-Filippini.

    While Tonti-Filippini had the title Ombudsman Decisions and was mentioned in the body’s 2017 annual report, a FOS staffer told Four Pillars she no longer worked there.

    Despite this, the fallout continues from her controversial handling of the case brought by toy and kite maker Goldie Marketing against ANZ Bank.

    Rex Patrick, a Centre Alliance (formerly Nick Xenophon Team) senator, says he’s been in discussions with Financial Services Minister Kelly O’Dwyer about expanding AFCA’s terms of reference to include procedural fairness, as well as other administrative tribunal standards.

    “I hold concerns in relation to this and am continuing my discussions with the minister on this issue,” Patrick says.

    The core issue is a series of telephone conversations in October 2014 between Tonti-Filippini and Goldie’s adviser Bruce Ford of Dispute Assist, in which the ombudsman told Ford she was ruling the case outside FOS’s terms of reference because of a staff shortage.

    In particular, there was a lack of key staff with banking expertise.

    Ford was stunned and Goldie decided to up the ante, arguing in the Victorian Supreme Court that a staff shortage was not a valid reason to decline jurisdiction.

    When FOS lodged its documents with the court, the case took an unexpected turn.

    Tonti-Filippini’s file notes suggested that she had provided a host of other reasons for declining to hear the case.

    The problem for FOS was that Ford had recorded the conversations — for his own legal protection and that of his client.

    While the court accepted the recordings were accurate, it nevertheless upheld FOS’s ruling that the Goldie case was outside its terms of reference. Importantly, however, the court didn’t rely on the file notes from Tonti-Filippini; it ruled instead that her later written reasons were sound.

    The matter did not end there.

    ASIC, which oversees FOS, was subsequently forced to correct the parliamentary record when it told a committee that the Supreme Court had considered the issue of the divergence between the tape recordings and the FOS file notes.

    In a subsequent letter to Ford, ASIC deputy chairman Peter Kell accepted that this was not the case.

    FOS said in a written response to questions from this column that it did not comment on staffing, and that the issues in the Goldie case had been “fully canvassed and addressed”.

    “At the time the issue was raised — following the court’s decision upholding FOS’s decision making — FOS made clear it did not agree with the assertions or that there were any implications for the fair, efficient and independent operation of FOS’s dispute scheme,” the statement said.

    FOS said it had dealt with 100,000 dispute cases since the Goldie matter, both in line with its terms of reference and as a fair, timely and impartial dispute resolution scheme.

    The service might retain complete confidence in itself, but others are not so sure.

    Read More...
    4 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic David Cohen unsigns the Bankers Oath in the forum
    David Cohen is no longer on the list of Signatories to APRA John Laker's and Jillian Broadbent's The Banking oath Organization, thebfo.org.
    Will Jeanie Pakula 's ethics department please explain why her APRA-chaired ethics board 'can't see' things.

    Read More...
    4 days ago
  • internationalbanker.com/banking/commonwe...-laundering-scandal/


    International Banker
    AUTHORITATIVE ANALYSIS ON INTERNATIONAL BANKING

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    Home Banking Commonwealth Bank of Australia—in the Midst of a Money-laundering Scandal
    Banking
    Commonwealth Bank of Australia—in the Midst of a Money-laundering Scandal
    December 20, 2017
    Commonwealth Bank of Australia—in the Midst of a Money-laundering Scandal

    By Phillip Mann, International Banker

    On November 15, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) held its annual general meeting (AGM), during which a small but notable protest vote emerged against the bank’s board appointments and executive remunerations. While the vote was not enough to warrant a mandatory board spill—the remuneration report still managed to gain 91.4 percent support, and the weakest majority vote among the four new director appointees to the board received 84 percent—it signalled that a considerable degree of discontent had emerged during a year in which the Australian stock market’s biggest company has had to face lawsuits over allegations that it breached anti-money-laundering and terrorism-financing rules.

    Indeed, the AGM followed revelations back in August that CBA had been sued by the Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC)—the government’s financial-crime agency—over 53,700 alleged breaches of such laws. The case concerns automated cash-deposit machines—known as “intelligent deposit machines”—that were introduced by CBA in 2012 and which allow customers to anonymously deposit and transfer cash, even when banks are closed. The machines count the cash and then instantly credit the designated recipient; they also allow for up to A$20,000 per deposit to be anonymously placed in recipient accounts, which can then be transmitted to offshore destinations.

    AUSTRAC contends that such machines were predominantly used by four money-laundering syndicates, three of which have ties to drug-importation and distribution networks. The syndicates were able to anonymously deposit and transfer cash, with one operation seeing more than $21 million being deposited into 11 CBA accounts between February 2015 and May 2016. Indeed, it is believed that the bank failed to report suspicious transactions totalling more than A$624 million ($497 million) that were transmitted through this network of deposit machines. While banks are required to flag transactions in excess of US$10,000 within 10 business days, CBA reportedly failed to deliver such reports for a period spanning three years. According to AUSTRAC, therefore, CBA failed to assess the money-laundering and terrorism-financing risks of those machines, and thus failed to sufficiently meet its transaction-monitoring requirements. It has thus filed 83 allegations concerning suspicious transaction reports and 19 allegations regarding customer due diligence. Moreover, the maximum penalty for each of CBA’s 53,700 breaches is up to $18 million, which means that the lender could end up being footed with a potentially massive financial obligation of nearly A$1 trillion if found guilty.

    According to AUSTRAC’s court filing, CBA’s conduct during this matter “has exposed the Australian community to serious and ongoing financial crime”, with the crime unit adding that the delays in the case have also led to “lost intelligence and evidence, including CCTV footage, further money laundering and lost proceeds of crime”. The bank also allegedly failed to act despite receiving a clear warning from the Australian federal police, which advised in late 2015 that numerous accounts “were connected with an investigation into serious criminal offences, including ‘drug import and unlawful processing of money’”, AUSTRAC claimed.

    In addition to AUSTRAC’s case, CBA also faces a shareholder class-action lawsuit, which alleges that the lender knew of the allegations but did not disclose them to shareholders prior to a drastic drop in the lender’s share price. In total, the bank failed to adequately report unusual transactions totalling more than A$77million. The lawsuit thus centres on the bank’s lack of disclosure of the AUSTRAC allegations to the Australian Stock Exchange, which the board admitted it knew of in the second half of 2015 but on which it made its first public comment only in August 2017 when AUSTRAC’s legal action was confirmed. The concurrent drop in share price during early August was, according to Andrew Watson, the national head of class actions at law firm Maurice Blackburn, “in the top one percent of price movements that CBA experienced in the past five years, making it apparent that the news was of material significance to shareholders”.

    In response to the allegations, CBA admitted in mid-December to some failings with respect to reporting on time to the authorities, a failure which it describes in legal filings as one “that deprived law enforcement of some additional intelligence”. The bank also cites systems-related glitches as being behind the problem rather than any nefarious actions taken internally, which in turn suggests that it is aiming for the thousands of failures to be considered as one single breach of the law, thus minimising the ultimate penalty imposed on the bank. While the case remains ongoing, moreover, CBA has cut bonuses for its executives and initiated an overhaul at board level. The bank’s CEO, Ian Narev, will also be stepping down from his position at the end of the financial year. “We let down our stakeholders and, regardless of the ins and outs of the legal claim, I am sorry for that as the chief executive,” Mr Narev recently admitted, adding that he takes accountability for the scandal.

    Additionally, CBA has now put in place measures to prevent its personal customers from depositing more than $20,000 per day at the bank’s ATMs. This means that the new limit will apply irrespective of how many deposit transactions are made in a day. According to the bank, this new measure “is another important step in the management of money-laundering risks. It strikes a balance between addressing our obligation and commitment to prevent financial crime and meeting our customers’ legitimate banking needs”. Nonetheless, the bank’s position remains clear with regards to the bulk of the claims—that most of the breaches were due to software errors. It also refuses to accept AUSTRAC’s contention that the bank’s failures equate to eight separate contraventions of the law, and denies the suspicious-transaction and due-diligence allegations. Indeed, CBA Chair Catherine Livingstone recently stated that the allegations made by AUSTRAC did not suggest that any of the bank’s employees had acted maliciously, nor had the bank acted deliberately to flaunt AUSTRAC laws.

    The allegations have also had some wider-reaching consequences, with the government in December deciding to implement a law that requires bitcoin exchanges operating in the country to register with AUSTRAC. The move is a direct result of growing concern from Parliament that financial crime in the country needs to be brought under control following CBA’s alleged violations.

    According to CBA, AUSTRAC had indicated it will file more allegations of legal breaches, which in turn would very likely cause the bank to update its own legal defence. It will also make clear to the court that it has taken specific steps over the last few years to strengthen its compliance against financial crime. Nonetheless, the bank faces much criticism from shareholders, regulators and politicians over its conduct, to the extent that a public inquiry into the bank’s misconduct was finally agreed upon in November. The case remains ongoing.

    Read More...
    5 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic Bowles 'spied' on anticorruption in qld in the forum
    Suitcases of cash. Barristers 'settling' disputes with cash payments in the Mayor's carry on luggage. Scandals galore. Does the victorian legal board often 'spy' on anti corruption campaigners and let the crooks lawyers operate with impugnity??

    THE State Government has pledged more than $14 million to the Crime and Corruption Commission to clean up councils across Queensland.

    Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk yesterday announced $14.25 million would be provided to the CCC to establish a new Office of the Independent Assessor in the upcoming state budget.

    "The Office of the Independent Assessor, when established, will deal with councillor conduct complaints, improved governance practices and enhanced delivery of more sustainable local government," she said.

    Read More...
    5 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic Extraordinary cover up: BankReformNow in the forum
    Thursday, April 14, 2016 4:06:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The SEC fellow called his Senior Counsel in on a call about the Legal Board of Vctoria and they fell off their chairs.
    President
    Australian Anti-Paedophile Party
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Dear Dr Pridgeon,

    we're shocked at Australia's cover ups.

    Good luck with the Royal Comission because you're almost there to get one

    Executive Summary: If there are pedos in the law, often its shrouded in lots of "he said, she said" family law. However we might have a case that's different. Can you imagine a legal services board that goes so far out of its way to protect a famous mining fracking accountant "Trevor Shane McTaggart" that it can't tell the difference between the landlord and the tenant?. Next it disagrees with everything and with whistleblower reports.

    But the whistleblower reports come true with unguessable things like Ian Narev and David Cohen's admissions they really were aware about whistleblowers in the Commbank Bribery Case?

    Or unguessable things like there really were undercover agents on a cocaine truck from California to New Jersey like the cocaine busts on Mastercard's Lawyer Keila Ravello. Her partner in crime is in Bloomberg qoutes as saying "I still can't tell how this unfolded". (The Legal Services blew the whistle to undercover police we think).

    Or the Colombian Shipping Container that disappeared from Mick Gatto's wharf. Who steals from the Calabrians and the Colombians! Better still, why are the legal services board's Tina Stagliano named in the reporters' files and in McGarvie's files on Trevor McTaggart.

    Yes, the crims couldn't see it coming, but the whistleblower reports reported it all. Is this the chance to expose the connection between crook lawyers in the "ethics police" and crims who use them to search for doctors against peds and crime?

    We went to the Victorian Legal Ombudsman Kate Hamond (she is the newspaper in an article headed "Victorian Lawyers are Evil and Dumb"

    www.theage.com.au/news/national/evil-and...134703644883.htmland

    and to Senator John Madigan (he wants a Royal Commission into the child custody area of the family law court).


    Police came but, in between them leaving for "Operation Purana Police" to come, the place was cleaned up and vaccuumed by someone who can move shipping containers very very fast.

    For very strange reasons the Victorian Legal Services Board people blew the whistle in hints to people with contacts in television and politics. Afterwards the Legal Services Board chased everywhere to find out what law enforcement agencies knew, like the American SEC.

    Very suspiciously the Legal Services Board pretended the landlord wanted "his" boxes from under the stairwell (but they were the tenant boxes, mostly brochures for Asian skyscraper developments and a place called "Old Mill Road" in Healesville Victoria).

    We think everyone should report the legal services board to someone because "it all came true".

    Most reently, a few weeks ago, the Commonwealth Bank's David Cohen confirmed in the Parliament that Ian Narev was told about the CBA Computer Bribes Contract at Computer Science Corp, like the witnesses reported to the American law agencies in 2014!

    (We've dubbed the Legal Services oard whistleblowers "The Oracle of Delphi").

    Good luck with the Election Campaign.

    Might we suggest that you tee up with groups who want a Royal Commission into the banking sector. In that area criss crosses the cocaine, the Trimbole Family "debt collectors" unlicensed lawyers, accountants in mining, and corrupted legal elite.

    Our whistleblow-ees are flabbergasted by the accuracy of the whistleblowing.

    Best Wishes



    Submitters to Senator Peter Whish-Wilson's Senate Inquiry into White Collar Crimes.




    Subject: US & 17 States v Amex, Mastercard, Visa;

    Thursday, April 14, 2016 2:57:00 PM
    Anonymous Fushin' trip said...

    The Aussie Election shapes up as Anti Royal Commission Bankers vs the Royal Commission Lobby. The Opposition Leader "Shorten" says he wants bankers in the Dock. (Is that 'slang' for those uuum fishing trips??)

    The Royal Commissioners might to rent a very big fishing boat :)

    Wednesday, April 20, 2016 12:42:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Ian Narev's lawyer "confessed" they knew about the bribes that affected Computer Science Corp! Some Forces of Light arranged Parliamentary Inquiries to quiz him! What's a Prelate Act for RICO?

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016 10:13:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Cardinel Pell's pal Michael McGarvie should be referred to the Anti-corruption watchdog "IBAC" says his own lass Jenny Pakula.

    Is it true they pretended to be "a landlord" and used "anonymous" complaints (by Trevor McTaggart's mob) to find out about international bribery crimes?

    Is it legal and ethical for the Victorian State Government's Legal Ethics Board of Miners & Frackers to spy on politicks on behalf of miners and frackers?

    Someone who fire up Airconn1. Can you imagine dragging unethical ethics lawyers into the slammer? :)

    Who is Brendan French?

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016 9:39:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Looks like high profile federal prosecutor Eileen Decker has a Commonwealth Bank executive Keith Hunter up on a sentencing hearing for international wire frauds against shareholders. The newspaper says Hunter might go away until he's 100 years old.

    Friday, October 28, 2016 4:06:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The SEC IRS FBI & DoJ have the Commonwealth Bank of Australia's I.T Expert Jon Waldron on an arrest warrant. His co-accused faces Disgorgement of about $30m too. BankReformNow.com.au were onto this during the elections of the politician in Queensland who helped the Huttons with Bendigo Bank too. Great to see the US Cavalry arresting bankers in Sydney. www.ccenterdispatch.com/news/state/artic...67-a4d79ce1ed85.html

    Friday, October 06, 2017 7:43:00 AM
    Anonymous Blind Freddie said...

    Wow, The Commonwealth Bank's two Chairman David Turner & Catherine Livingstone, Secretary-Lawyer David Cohen, CEO and "all" the non executive directors were served with a class action today for concealing moneylaundering and counter terrorism violations. Meanwhile the Julia Gillard Scandals continue. Radio Host Michael Smith asked the Federal Court to remove Gillard's former business partner Judge Bernard Murphy from the Bench. Smith's complaint says:
    Monday, 09 October 2017
    The Honourable JLB Allsop AO Chief Justice
    Federal Court of Australia Dear Chief Justice,
    MURPHY, Bernard Michael - apparent misconduct as a solicitor - fitness to sit as a Judge; From 1986 to August 1995 MURPHY was a partner in the law firm Slater and Gordon.

    Slater and Gordon acted for the Australian Workers' Union Victoria branch from 1988/89 until MURPHY's departure from the firm in August 1995.

    In 1995 MURPHY was the firm's senior partner and head of its industrial relations practice. He was a fiduciary to the Australian Workers' Union.

    Monday, October 09, 2017 7:36:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The server of the bank lawyers' friend, Howard Bowles, has words on it like 501c3, PAC, SEC, FBI IC Unit and racketeering. Richard Dennis' lawyers also reckon there's a racket, no matter what Michael McGarvie advised his Victorian Minister for Counterterrorism Robert Clark in response to complaints by accountants that Bowles' foreign government board passes information to very shady characters while Austrac investigated breaches of anti moneylaundering and counter terrorism laws by the I.T Department in the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. Great to see the Bob Katter's "cross bench" want Turnbull to be sacked so a Royal Commission can investigate things like cartel laws. See www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/11/12/bob...m_hp_ref=au-homepage. Also good to see that I.T Vice Presidents in the CBA will be extradited. Foreign Boards shouldn't use their Act to cover up for crims and moneylaunderers, should they?

    Sunday, November 12, 2017 7:47:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The State of California is one of the largest stockholders in that Australian bank, "Commonwealth Bank", that's at the center of 53,000 breaches of international counterterrorism and moneylaundering laws for years. Newspapers say that the whole Board at the bank could be sacked by institutional shareholders like First Superannuation because the bank concealed the violations for years and hoped that Australian regulators, like Fiona Bennett's ethics board ans "APRA", could stop US Federal agents. But the anti-terrorism agency AUSTRAC wasn't going to cover it up. Do you think the bank's VP David Cohen should surrender his passports (plural), or should he be grabbed at departure lounges and whisked away on Airconn1 to Guam for questioning?

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017 4:52:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The DEA and IRS got the lawyer for Mastercard, Keila Ravelo, to admit her role with criminals that doctored Australian Reserve Bank documents which affected US cases like US & 17 States v American Express, Mastercard and Visa. Let's hope that Ravelo hands over all the lawyers and bankers involved now that the giant scam on retailers and consumers was exposed.

    Wednesday, November 29, 2017 1:48:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The Royal Commissioner Judge Kenneth Hayne - Finally - says he WILL hear from bank victims. The webpage of the Australian Council of Trade Unions also wants to hear from victims. Do you think its ethical and legal for foreign boards to lean on customers of the Victorian Government legal ethics board during covert undercover work on criminal transporters of narcotics and Reserve Bank Amex Mastercard and Visa information that was doctored in Antitrust Cases in order to scam US stores to settle for pennies on the dollar? Or do you think that foreign officials shoul be extradited for running a protection racket to keep criminals and their lawyers, like Keila Ravelo, safe from US justice?

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018 1:56:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    He has Yolinda's story on his staffers' desk.

    Saturday, March 03, 2018 10:39:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Royal Commissioner Hayne quized NAB Bankers about toxic fraudulent loans being packaged up and sold to investors as rock solid deals. The NAB Board knew, say news reports. Iirc, Hillary Clinton complained before the GFC in 2008 about US investors being conned by foreign banks. What do you think should be done with foreign bank executives? CBA Bank's Jon Waldron and Keith Hunter face extradition so is that a fate that awaits boards of banks down under?

    Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:06:00 AM
    Blogger Shareholders said...

    Dr Peter Brandson's BankreformNow facebook pages cover the revelations made by the Queens Counsel to her Royal Commissioner Kenneth Haynes QC. Heads should roll. Bank directors knew all about it say the press coverage.

    Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:50:00 PM Delete
    Blogger Shareholders said...

    Whistleblower of the legal servics board's whistleblown inner secrets, Elliot Sgargetta, may be on Australia's tv show "The Project".

    Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:53:00 PM Delete
    Blogger Shareholders said...

    Victorian Judge Randall sacked the lawyers Hibbert & Hodges' Glenn Hodges and Barrister Mathew Stirling from running a case at huge cost for a 90 year old widow, her daughter in law (a relative of Dan Tehan, Minister for Cybersecurity) and a son who retained "the biggest con artist that I (Kelvin Thompson from the Parliament's International Treaties Committee) ever saw, McTaggart. Good Heavens. For years the legal ethics board backed McTaggart and let him run a boiler room of people who posed as lawyers to scam $30,000,000 from the unsuspecting public. Australian legal ethics boards backed the wrong side this time. Word is the legal board passed inside information to Mctaggart about US antitrust cases where Reserve Bank documents were found smuggled by trans-US cocaine transporters to Mastercard's lawyer Keila Ravelo. The DEA and DoJ's Andrew Kogan have a Sentencing Hearing on her fairly soon. She was cenrral to what the National Retail Federation said was conduct so unethical that Judges cancelled Settlements between 3,400,000 Amex Card Merchants and 12,000,000 Mastercard and Visa's merchant stores.

    Friday, March 16, 2018 2:13:00 AM Delete
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    This is how the CBA operates..
    Push it as far as they can under their Corporation Rug.
    Hoping their muscle power, chosen position will let it pass over if they just say “SORRY”
    There is many systemic and cultures issues that have been condoned by many and allowing this to happen without accountability or consequences.
    Just look at the CBA $76 million plus Ponzi Scheme...
    This involves the CBA Head Office Branch Box Hill.
    I unknowingly, alerted the Top Senior Sales Manager, Box Hill, on the 19/02/2007.
    I attended a meeting I arranged and informed Mr Brendan Epps, that we were really concerned and very distressed because it would appear we are Victims of some sort of scam..
    We need help urgently...
    Mr Brendan Epps, persona changed , he went all white and sweaty but he denied us any help...
    Stated that he had full faith in Mr Bill Jordanou and had approved and facilitated many Loans with him..
    And what happened Next was the biggest Cover Up..
    We became CBA Bank Enemy No 1
    All relevant documentation was denied us.
    But most of all No Investigation..!!!!!!!
    The Big Cover Up was put into ACTION.
    I approached the CBA many many times and all doors slammed in my FACE...
    I was abused, bullied and desrespected
    The CBA was ruthless, without empathy or compassion and the CBA only aim was to destroy, discredit and eliminate....
    And the performance of the CBA Representative yesterday, just validated and vindicated all the allegations being made by all the Victims of the CBA..
    The CBA will not help..
    The CBA put into action their plan to deceive and mislead and the CBA do this by creating that web of deceit and confusion by producing all these scenarios and producing all these plans “in the future”
    Just to avoid their responsibilities!!!!!!
    Great Reporting ....The News Daily,,,
    Keep up the good work Commissioner Hayne and his amazing assistants....
    CBA waited two years to admit insurance problems to ASIC
    The Commonwealth Bank waited two years before admitting to ASIC that it had sold insurance protection on personal loans to 20,000 customers
    thenewdaily.com.au. Debbie Barker, Mildura Australia.

    Tuesday, March 20, 2018 1:28:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Bendigo Boss bails.
    Mar 26 2018 at 10:37 AM
    Updated Mar 26 2018 at 5:42 PM


    Bendigo and Adelaide Bank managing director Mike Hirst to retire



    Mike Hirst says banks need to motivate staff more and incentivise them less.
    Mike Hirst says banks need to motivate staff more and incentivise them less. Arsineh Houspian
    James Frost AFR Woodcut

    Share on twitter

    by James Frost

    Outgoing Bendigo and Adelaide Bank managing director Mike Hirst has drawn parallels between Australian cricket's ball-tampering scandal and the Hayne royal commission, saying leaders need to step up and take responsibility for the misconduct of team members.

    As the veteran banker prepares to step aside after nine years in the top job, he also took a parting shot at the regulators such as the Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority, which curtailed the ability of the smaller banks to take the fight to their bigger rivals.

    "It's a bit like having one arm tied behind your back," Mr Hirst said. "You are trying to do the right thing by customers by not pushing volume, and it makes it difficult. Our ability to grow the business would have been hugely helped by an even playing field."

    Over the past 10 years, the total share return for shareholders has been 163 per cent. That's about half the total return from sector leader Commonwealth Bank at 308 per cent, but within striking distance of the larger banks' average at 228 per cent.

    Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:43:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Do US law enforcement like the SEC rely on these Australian regulators during global investigations? Customers of their bank regulator's Ms Bennett's legal ethics board cheered when the US DoJ Criminal Division's chief Thomas Eicher signe off a plea agreement with Mastercard's lawyer in the Reserve Bank Document Smuggling Scandal that was covered up by foreign officials.


    We need an inquiry into ASIC - it's an embarrassment
    By Michael Pascoe
    27 March 2018 — 10:45am

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    If you want to feel heat in Townsville, sledge the Cowboys NRL side or just mention the name “Storm Financial”.

    Storm was Emmanuel and Julie Cassimatis’ Townsville-based cowboy (no relation) finance outfit that destroyed the savings of thousands of clients, making the Cassimatis rich while setting poor people up to lose their homes.
    ASIC received the penalties it requested for Emmanuel and Julie Cassimatis: fines of $70,000 each and banned for seven years from managing corporations.

    ASIC received the penalties it requested for Emmanuel and Julie Cassimatis: fines of $70,000 each and banned for seven years from managing corporations.
    Photo: Jim Rice

    Partially enabled by three banks that didn’t care where business came from as long as it came, Storm ripped out rich fees for absolutely poisonous financial advice, making outrageous promises to people who didn’t know any better.

    The Storm model was to encourage people, however poor, to gear up beyond their eyeballs and punt on Storm products and the stock market never correcting. Pensioners mortgaging humble homes on the promise of getting rich quick? No, it doesn’t end well.

    Last week in its most pathetic effort since it waved feathers at the perpetrators of the Firepower fraud, ASIC received the penalties it requested for Emmanuel and Julie Cassimatis: fines of $70,000 each and banned for seven years from managing corporations.

    Tuesday, March 27, 2018 5:12:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Austrac says child exploitation was part of the racket. !!!!

    New AUSTRAC boss Nicole Rose shocked by 'depth and breadth' of money laundering
    AM
    By senior business correspondent Peter Ryan

    Posted yesterday at 10:56am
    Thick bundles of 50 and 100 dollar notes sit stuffed inside a duffel bag
    Photo: AUSTRAC's job is to make sure cash from illegal activities isn't laundered into the legitimate economy. (Supplied: District Court of WA)
    Related Story: CBA rejects bulk of fresh money-laundering allegations
    Related Story: CBA warned terrorist his account was about to be closed: AUSTRAC
    Related Story: CBA the only bank in AUSTRAC's sights over money-laundering scandal

    Australia's financial intelligence czar Nicole Rose says she is shocked at the depth of money laundering in the economy involving organised crime, child exploitation and drug importation.

    "I thought coming from the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission that I had a pretty good handle on serious and organised crime," she told the ABC's AM program.

    Thursday, April 05, 2018 9:13:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I can tell my experience in money laundering known to be going on by Perpetual Trustees and the NAB by a criminal mortgage broker ..... Google Dominic Cincotta .... for some 10 years both banks knew of his money laundering which was never reported to AUSTRAC, AFP etc..... they were breaking serious law .... $25m off to Hong Kong for drugs. False mortgage funds he brokered

    Saturday, April 07, 2018 9:09:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    If Nicole Rose's Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission didn't know about human trafficking, child abuse, narcotics and organised crime and the banks, just as well customers of Fiona Bennett's legal ethics board reported its whistleblown tip offs to US agencies like FinCen.

    Saturday, April 07, 2018 9:14:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Texan, California and masshole teechers, pensioners and public servant retirement funds are suing that famous Commonwealth Bank of Australia. finance.nine.com.au/2018/04/10/13/28/us-...st-commonwealth-bank. In other news their I.T expert Jon Waldron was comitted to face trial in Sydney on charges of international bribery, and the Australian fincen chief said she was shocked to see the extent of child exploitation and violations of the antimoneylaundering laws.

    Tuesday, April 10, 2018 12:00:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Pension fund giants back Commonwealth Bank class action
    New Commonwealth Bank CEO Matt Comyn. Picture: James Croucher
    New Commonwealth Bank CEO Matt Comyn. Picture: James Croucher

    The Australian
    1:21AM April 10, 2018

    Eric Johnston
    Business Review Editor
    Sydney
    @ejohnno

    Some of the world’s biggest pension funds are planning to launch a class action against the Commonwealth Bank, claiming the lender engaged in misleading conduct and committed a string of disclosure breaches relating to a separate legal claim brought last year by anti-money laundering agency Austrac.

    The class action, which has not yet been lodged but was announced last night, has backing from some of CBA’s major shareholders, including heavyweight United States public pension funds with a combined net worth of nearly $US500bn.

    This includes the $US224bn California State Teachers Retirement System (CalSTRS), the $US150bn Teachers Retirement System of Texas (Texas TRS), the $US71bn Massachusetts Pension Reserves Investment Management Board, and US$44bn Colorado Public Employees Retirement Association, according to Melbourne-based law firm Phi Finney McDonald

    Tuesday, April 10, 2018 1:19:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Says the Australian Financial Review: "Mr Comyn will be looking to replace members of his 10-person-strong executive team following three resignations including that of group executive Kelly Bayer-Rosmarin just two weeks ago. The remaining group level executives including private banking head Adam Bennett, head of legal Anna Lenhahan, chief financial officer Rob Jesudason and chief risk officer David Cohen."

    www.afr.com/business/banking-and-finance...nder-20180409-h0yj5p

    Tuesday, April 10, 2018 2:20:00 PM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    4BC Radio Brisbane just reported that American pension funds with a worth of $500 billion are suing the CBA because the CBA hid things from the stock market. Sydney Radio 2GB said the same.

    www.4bc.com.au/pension-giants-launch-cla...t-commonwealth-bank/

    Wednesday, April 11, 2018 12:46:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The Royal Commission intends to question Australia's corporate lapdog, ASIC. Is it true that Australia's ASIC and APRA allowed sub prime doctored figures to be sold as AAA to Americans and the Bank of International Settlements? Crikey, SIC's chairman Medcraft was on Wall Street's IOSCO and he let these bogus figures be sold to US investors?

    Wednesday, April 11, 2018 1:02:00 AM
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    by James Frost

    Outgoing Bendigo and Adelaide Bank managing director Mike Hirst has drawn parallels between Australian cricket's ball-tampering scandal and the Hayne royal commission, saying leaders need to step up and take responsibility for the misconduct of team members.

    As the veteran banker prepares to step aside after nine years in the top job, he also took a parting shot at the regulators such as the Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority, which curtailed the ability of the smaller banks to take the fight to their bigger rivals.

    "It's a bit like having one arm tied behind your back," Mr Hirst said. "You are trying to do the right thing by customers by not pushing volume, and it makes it difficult. Our ability to grow the business would have been hugely helped by an even playing field."

    Over the past 10 years, the total share return for shareholders has been 163 per cent. That's about half the total return from sector leader Commonwealth Bank at 308 per cent, but within striking distance of the larger banks' average at 228 per cent.

    Friday, April 20, 2018 12:35:00 AM
    Blogger Shareholders said...
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Ms Fox, chair of the Australian Shareholders Association says its like Madoff's ponzi scheme down there, and she wants them all jailed. Is it true the State of California is a shareholder, along with US pension funds like CalSTRS, in that "Con's Bank" that was caught vioating counterterrorism and mneylaundering laws AND there was Child Exploitation too, says Austrac's antimoneylaundering agency's chief Ms Nicole Rose. Was Fiona Barnett right about the child trafficking and the 'protection racket' by foreign officials? Have foreign officials and these bankers ripped off American pension funds and covered up all the violations of the laws in Executive Orders For Extradition?

    Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00:00 AM

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    5 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic Complaints by Americans in the forum
    bankvictims.com.au/financial-planners/it...through-bendigo-bank

    This article is reported by Bank Victims American Correspondent, BendigoBanksters

    Dr Alexander Douglas (Independent) MP for Gavin, has warned the Australian Public about the Bendigo Bank and he has even said it in the Queensland Parliament, refusing all requests from the Mike Hirst CEO of the Bendigo Bank to withdraw it....!!

    It is not only the Bendigo Bank that Dr Douglas is after, it is all Banks operating in Queensland and he has some very serious concerns relating to them indeed, the question that needs to be on everyone's lips is... why is it that our Federal Politicians are so Mute on the matter and what do they have to hide...!!!

    MATTERS OF PUBLIC INTEREST Bendigo Bank Dr DOUGLAS (Gaven—UAP) (11.42am):

    Today I say beware all borrowers of the Bendigo Bank when taking out a mortgage with that bank and signing their documents. There are loaded clauses in these documents that may lead to a very good borrower, families and businesses; losing everything through no fault of their own. I want honourable members to listen to this story and consider how they might advise their own constituents and their families. There are 120 branches of the Bendigo Bank in Queensland alone.

    The property that I am describing is an historic fire station on the Maroondah Highway in Ringwood, which is an outer eastern suburb of Melbourne. However, there are many other similar examples. I want to tell members about what has been going on. I refer to a document regarding one couple.

    In August 2012 their finance facilities expired. Bendigo advised the owner that they should refinance in the middle of the SBC market rental review required under the lease and retail tenancies act.

    Efforts to refinance met with similar responses such as ‘until the rental review is determined a valuation cannot be done’. Bendigo’s response was that it did not believe that to be the case and in any event it was not their problem.

    With no notice or warning, Bendigo took control of the property on 23 October 2012 appointing two liquidators as ‘controllers’. Bendigo claimed to have served notice of default seven days before, which the owners never received. This is the critical thing; it is about the documents. In a reprehensible display of unfairness, Bendigo gave its default notice by apparently sliding it under the locked door of the tenants’ restaurant—not the owners of the building—which the tenants deny ever receiving, knowing full well that the owners would not receive it.

    Bendigo gave the default notice to the third party and they knew it was in the middle of a rental dispute with those current tenants.

    Bendigo hides behind an unfair, absurd law which they say allows them to give notices to a customer’s address shown in the mortgage at the land registry. Bendigo argues that this is a fair notice despite

    (a) knowing that its customer left the mortgage address five years earlier;
    (b) knowing a third unrelated party would receive the default notice, not the customer;
    (c) never telling the owners, who are the current owners of the property, that they should amend their address in the mortgage; and

    (d) the owners, having notified Bendigo in writing and having receipted it in writing years earlier, in this case seven years, and strictly complying with Bendigo’s change of address procedures in the terms and conditions, that still was not done. Bendigo says that they comply with the banking code of practice, but they expect everyone to act reasonably and fairly towards them in a consistent, ethical manner which they claim to be doing in relation to the owners of this property. Is it ethical, fair and reasonable:

    (a) for Bendigo to have mandatory address change procedures for customers which say absolutely nothing about being required to formally change the address kept at the land register;
    (b) for customers to give Bendigo their new addresses, 100 per cent in accordance with procedure;
    (c) that Bendigo accepted customers new addresses and sent hundreds of letters and statements to that new address over five years—that is exactly what happened to these people and there are plenty of examples like this;
    (d) for the most important notice ever sent by Bendigo to be left at a third-party address, which was critical as it meant that they are now in the process of losing their property, which is going to be auctioned on Thursday;

    (e) that Bendigo did not send that critical note to one of at least three addresses where the owners had expressly asked for correspondence to be sent?

    Any chance of refinancing vanished when Bendigo appointed controllers seven days after leaving the notice at the one place where they know the owners would not receive it. Bendigo was never at risk. There was ample equity. I am going to table the documents.

    Tabled paper: Correspondence regarding Art Pacific Pty Ltd and Bendigo Bank Ltd [3887].

    There was ample equity in the property with an LVR of 64 per cent and ample income to satisfy the loan. Their entire loan, which was charged 5.71 per cent interest, was dropped into an overdraft and charged at 14.16 per cent. None of the $115,000 rent for that facility was credited to the contract. With all the penalties, costs, controllers fees imposed since October 2012 totaling $612,000, the LVR—the loan to value ratio—is now at 90 per cent.

    In conclusion, Bendigo has claimed that the magistrate ruled in its favour, but that is not the case. This couple, who was fighting this case—and there are others—were actually not deemed to have leave to appeal on a procedural technicality, yet Bendigo has put out press releases saying that it ruled in their favour. Bendigo has not settled this case with this couple properly and it is using the law to defend its case. These people may also lose their own home. The bank gets their money and income at 14.6 per cent with controllers fees at $600,000.

    This is good business if you can get it. Bendigo Bank stands condemned by its actions.

    Alexander_Douglas-Gaven-20131029-758138927869.docx

    Source: Alex Douglas Member for Gavin. Record of Proceedings, 29 October 2013

    Read More...
    5 days ago
  • Charles Ponzi replied to the topic Pensioners are revolting! in the forum
    LATEST NEWS !!

    AGED AUSTRALIANS IN REVOLT .

    ENOUGH IS ENOUGH !

    Large political Parties are taking note that a group of Aged pensioners are willing to take them on at the next Federal Election .

    The AAPG group - Australian Aged Pensioners Group were formed to ensure the Aged get a voice in Canberra ( they make up 20% of Aus population) ,

    AAPG are focused on important issues that affect Aged Pensioners , below poverty pension , unacceptable changes to retirement age , unfair pension rates for couples , out of date rental assistance rates are not meeting housing market changes , removing 1.2 million Pensioners from Poverty , ensuring the Aged Care industry provides an acceptable & safe level of service to the old & frail . The removal of the Welfare Card , ensuring Pensioners are not seen as Welfare recipients , the promotion of the Aged as being a contributing force in the community , respected & valued as past tax payers .

    The AAPG has to overcome a major barrier that all ambitious political groups are faced with when they want to become a Political Party in Australia

    Read More...
    6 days ago

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